Walk in the footsteps of our tupuna, become a Kaitiaki of our legacy.

Our scholarships are designed to build our leadership, connecting talented people to our rich cultural heritage and legacy.

We support a range of disciplines, with preference for studies related to our business such as law, accounting and marketing. Studies in the applied sciences of viticulture, aquaculture and horticulture are a priority. Whenua is at the core of our legacy, and careers in property are critical to our future development. 

How Wakatū scholarships work

Each scholarship provides the successful applicant with financial support for fees and books, up to a maximum of three years. There are also bonus opportunities for studying Te Reo Māori and achieving academic merit. Study can be in New Zealand or overseas but must be through a recognised tertiary provider.

 Who can apply

Applicants must be Wakatū shareholders or descendants of Wakatū shareholders and demonstrate a strong desire to get qualified. To apply for a Wakatū scholarship please complete the online application from which a shortlist and interviews will be carried out.

Tertiary Education Scholarship online application form

Applications opened on Monday 14 August 2017 and close 5pm Tuesday 31 October 2017.


Past recipients

The programme has been supporting Wakatū whanau since 2000 – we are enormously proud of what they have achieved.


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Jessica Sanderson

Te Ātiawa

Bachelor of Performance Design

“I am an artist who works primarily with video. For the last few years I’ve been working for TVNZ based in Tamaki-makau-rau. I am an editor and director creating trailers and promos for shows as well as advertising for their creative department – Blacksand. My latest directing and producing project was for Sony Music NZ. I directed a music video for Stan Walker and Ginny Blackmore’s song, Holding You.  My scholarship from Wakatū Incorporation enabled me to complete a four year degree through Massey University and Toi Whakaari: NZ Drama School. Creative production combines many disciplines, I would recommend taking subjects such as art, design, film, history, photography and English. If you are working as a freelance designer or director you also need to be able to budget and plan. A good understanding of taxes and running your own affairs will help.  You are never too young to write and express yourself!  Decide whose opinion you trust and admire, and listen to those people when it comes to feedback on your work. Be brave.  Good luck!”

 
 

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Turi McFarlane

Te Ātiawa

Bachelor of Science (Agricultural Science & Ecology), Master of Applied Science (International Rural Development) Environment Extension Manager

“I am passionate about our relationship as Māori to the whenua and have based my career around sustainable land use and production. I work as an Environment Extension Manager with Beef & Lamb New Zealand specialising in building the relationship we have as farmers and growers with our environment. I completed my qualifications with the support of Wakatū Incorporation. As part of my study, I travelled to Antarctica and spent time with the New Zealand Antarctic programme looking at different aspects of seal migration and glacial movements. Part of this study also looked at the relationship we as Māori have with Antarctica and historical accounts of navigation in Antarctic waters. I am very grateful for the support and really encourage our people to take up the challenge and change the reality of their whānau and themselves.


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Tuaiwa Rickard

Ngāti Koata

Master of Science (Environmental), Bachelor of Science & Maori

As a trained environmental scientist Tuaiwa started her career at NIWA (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research) where she was instrumental in developing an easy to use estuarine tool-kit for Iwi and hapū to monitor the health of their coastal resources. Empowering Iwi and hapū to utilise science, and giving them the tools to determine what’s really happening with their resources has been an ongoing passion for Tuaiwa that led her to the world of television where she associate produced, directed, researched and coordinated for Māori Televisions science series “Project Mātauranga” and “Project Whenua.” Currently Tuaiwa is coordinating a Coastal Dune Restoration Project on some Wakatū whenua at Mārahau. She sees it as giving back to the whanau who have supported her in education.